Warren Kennaugh Helps Others Find the Right Fit

Warren Kennaugh is a Behavioural Strategist with WK Global and works closely with senior executives, elite athletes and sporting organisations to develop and further enhance their capability. Warren’s leadership in behavioural change has seen him deliver development programs that include: Senior Executive Coaching & Development, Advanced Leadership, Human Capital Due Diligence, Strategic Planning, Team Building, Sales Strategy Development, BPR and Generation Y.

Warren discusses with Dalton Koss HQ the importance of understanding your values and behaviours to ensure best fit within your chosen career.

I started my career as a mechanical engineer. Arguably it served me the most compared to other work I have done over my career. I take an engineering approach to understand people. For example, when building a bridge you need to understand its construction from the detail to the big picture. It is the same with people. You need to understand their underlying values, motivations and expectations to the bigger picture of what they want to achieve in life. After a few years in the engineering sector, I decided that I wanted to expand my knowledge and opportunities beyond practical engineering application.

I made a move into the banking and finance sector by taking up a sales role. I was in this industry for 5-6 years and worked my way up into leadership roles. During 1995, my organisation went through a restructure and I saw it as an opportunity to start my own coaching and facilitation company. On reflection 25 years later, I was happy that I made this choice when I did.

Since 1995, I have worked with 50-60 major organisations, specifically with senior executives. In early 2006, I was approached to work with elite athletes in national sporting teams. I was asked to build their emotional and behavioural capabilities. My first role was working with the Wallabies in the lead up to the 2007 World Cup. This experience created further opportunities in the sports industry. I have now worked with ARU, SANZAR, World Rugby Referees, World Rugby Teams, Cricket Teams, Australian and International Umpires, Elite Equestrians and World Golfers.

These experiences taught me that there isn’t a lot of difference between elite athletes and high-level professionals. There are many similarities in the skills they value or undervalue, judgements that are made, and their goal oriented drive. I seek to understand these polarities and how they are applied in daily approaches to work. These two major groups of professionals also face similar dilemmas, for example, where and what are their blind spots and how will these cost them? For five years, I served on the Board of a NRL Team and held a number of advisory roles on banking and financing boards and financial services.

One key word that I use to describe successful and effective leadership is fit. You need to find a role that fits your values and behaviours. This role needs to be in an organisation where the team and other leaders value what you value otherwise you will not engage and will feel disconnected. You need to understand how you operate. Those who are technically good at what they do will often move to other organisations until they find a better fit based on their values. By not discovering our values the daily bump and grind of our role is more articulated compared to the enjoyment of a role when our values and skills are the right fit. As a consequence of not understanding these values there is lot of wasted energy in the workplace. Philosophically, I understand the need to earn money in a role that is not satisfying to ensure personal financial responsibilities are met. However, there comes a point in time when this lack of satisfaction becomes too hard and it will be apparent whether you are the employer or the employee.

The key to my success is to always follow my nose. I believe in myself even in the face of detractors. I tend to be a little on the edge, different and so far it has worked for me. I push my boundaries and find my own path. Often, I had wished that I had done things faster. I see this as my failure; I wasn’t quick enough to take action. These situations were always associated with self-doubt. There were opportunities I missed because of my self-doubt and this is how I learnt to always believe in myself.

A professional life is not simple anymore; the rate of thinking has changed. We are more connected and the lines of authority are somewhat blurred. There is whole series of disruptors in our world that creates complexities where as 30-40 years ago professional life was a lot clearer. There were direct lines of professional responsibility. Now there are more options, which can be viewed positively but it comes as a cost due to increased complexities.

My success is attributed to the combination of having an idea and running with it. I work hard and I am very blessed to bump into the right people at the right time. There seems to be a general aligning of the planets. I am strongly supported by my family, which is critically important for me. I am lucky that I can follow any train of thought across any occupation, which is important in my role. I am easy to get along with and I am humble. No matter what I do, I always apply integrity and honesty. It is important to work out what you are good at and how to grow in this area so you can become the best you can be.

Live life and be observant is the number one rule to learning about yourself. Build yourself a strong support network and have trusted advisors who can be honest with you and you with them. Take nothing personally and challenge yourself. Take on a big project, we don’t learn in our comfort zones. If you are not drowning at times, you are probably not where you want to be. Learn and practice the art of self-reflection and self-awareness.

I use the McKenzie Three Horizon model to plan ahead. This approach allows me to identify what I need to be doing to be effective for the next 12-18 months, what opportunities can manifest in the next 3-5 years and what wild and crazy ideas can I seed for fruition in 5 years and beyond. It is important that I think creatively and I am innovative in my approach. It is important for me to be continuously learning so that I can assist people across all their challenges. I am lucky that I am ambitious and inquisitive about how things work. I am curious. These personal attributes are critical for my success. I think we are in an age where we need to think like a consultant no matter your role. Unless you are better than the next person, you get passed over. To be a good leader it requires emotional intelligence to understand yourself and others. Some people are too self aware and others are not aware at all.

It is important to find a good mentor. Learn from the best in the world. This person has most likely covered the majority of the territory you are interested in, even looking under and between the rocks. Find a philosophy or a person you align with. If it is a person, contact them, if it is a philosophy apply it to all that you do.

To learn more about Warren and his work as a Behavioural Strategist, please click on the links below:

Website: http://www.warrenkennaugh.com

Connect with Warren on Linked In: https://au.linkedin.com/in/warrenkennaugh

Follow Warren on Twitter: @Warren_Kennaugh and @WKGlobal

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